Tag Archives: Therapy

Preschool Depression?

NYT Magazine: Can Preschoolers Be Depressed?

One established [treatment] method is called Parent-Child Interaction Therapy, or P.C.I.T. Originally developed in the 1970s to treat disruptive disorders — which typically include violent or aggressive behavior in preschoolers — P.C.I.T. is generally a short-term program, usually 10 to 16 weeks under the supervision of a trained therapist, with ongoing follow-up in the home. Luby adapted the program for depression and began using it in 2007 in an ongoing study on a potential treatment. During each weekly hourlong session, parents are taught to encourage their children to acquire emotion regulation, stress management, guilt reparation and other coping skills. The hope is that children will learn to handle depressive symptoms and parents will reinforce those lessons.

A Life in Therapy

My Life in Therapy, from the NYT Magazine, has Daphne Merkin recalling years spent in psychoanalysis.

Projection. Repression. Acting out. Defenses. Secondary compensation. Transference. Even in these quick-fix, medicated times, when people are more likely to look to Wellbutrin and life coaches than to the mystique-surrounded, intangible promise of psychoanalysis, these words speak to me with all the charged power of poetry…

Free CBT L.A.

It’s that time again:  the free CBT clinic at the Southern California Counseling Center runs from 2 to 6pm today, August 1st.  My quick interview with clinic founder, John Tsilimparis, is here.  [UPDATE: SCCC’s Free CBT Clinic no longer operating.]

Phone Therapy

 

The Los Angeles Times looks at phone therapy (it works).

The therapist-patient relationship is crucial to people battling depression, addiction, weight gain and diabetes. But that relationship might not always have to be in person to be effective…

What Happens in Therapy?

What happens in therapy?  Good question.  Couch Fiction, a book-length comic by British psychotherapist, Philippa Perry, offers some answers.

Based on a case study of Pat (our sandal-wearing, cat-loving psychotherapist) and her new client, James (an ambitious barrister with a potentially harmful habit he can’t stop), this graphic novel follows the anxieties, frustrations, mind-wanderings and break-throughs of each, through a year of therapy sessions together.

On the page:  What he says, what she says…what he’s thinking, what she’s thinking.  At page bottom, explanations about the theory behind various therapeutic interventions, missteps made, etc.

See a (very positive) review here…and an author interview here.

(Also at WTCI)